Women’s Flemish Hood

SKU: 4569HZ-1-1-2-1-2-3-2-2-3-2.

Women’s Flemish Hood

$46.95

    • Based on contemporary medieval artwork(see Historical Inspirations below)
    • Authentic lines for comfortable, distinguished look
    • Completely lined and reversible
    • Made in 100% Linen
    • All interior seams enclosed or finished
    • Available in a diverse palette that includes jewel tones and muted colors

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About our 15th c. Women's Flemish Hood

The fifteenth century is known for its elegant gowns and its outlandish headwear. While every young woman with a princess fantasy has grown up seeing images of the simple, elegant henin and organza silk veil , many of the other options from this period involve tall or curled “horns” and elaborate shapes that would seem more at home in gothic architecture than on a lady’s head! While such styles can be particularly fun to reproduce, they are neither comfortable nor always practical.

A comfortable, simple and lightweight alternative is our Flemish Hood, sometimes also called a “winged-hood”, and is often seen in paintings of 15th C. country women of both the middle and upper classes. Close-fitting to the head and neck, the front opening has long edges that fold back for a contrasting look, and the peak of the hood ends in a short liripipe, or tail. Fully lined, this also makes the hood fully reversible, creating two garments in one!

Our Flemish hood is derived from a number of sources, including Herjolfsnes Hood #78, carbon dated to 1352-1442, the “Shepard's dance”, MS Lat.873.f21. French, late 15th century, Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris, and Boccace's "Le Decameron" 1435.

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White, Black, Red, Royal Blue, Burgundy, Purple

Slate Blue, Sage, Dark Green, Oatmeal, Dark Brown, Gold

Note: Please note, with the difficulty of accurately representing colors on a variety of monitors, the color names are meant as descriptions along with the swatches. Please use both when deciding on what color to order. Also, despite how the colors may appear on your monitor the same color names in Wool, Silk and Linen are different and do not exactly coordinate.

The fifteenth century is known for its elegant gowns and its outlandish headwear. While every young woman with a princess fantasy has grown up seeing images of the simple, elegant henin and organza silk veil , many of the other options from this period involve tall or curled “horns” and elaborate shapes that would seem more at home in gothic architecture than on a lady’s head! While such styles can be particularly fun to reproduce, they are neither comfortable nor always practical.

A comfortable, simple and lightweight alternative is our Flemish Hood, sometimes also called a “winged-hood”, and is often seen in paintings of 15th C. country women of both the middle and upper classes. Close-fitting to the head and neck, the front opening has long edges that fold back for a contrasting look, and the peak of the hood ends in a short liripipe, or tail. Fully lined, this also makes the hood fully reversible, creating two garments in one!

Our Flemish hood is derived from a number of sources, including Herjolfsnes Hood #78, carbon dated to 1352-1442, the “Shepard’s dance”, MS Lat.873.f21. French, late 15th century, Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris, and Boccace’s “Le Decameron” 1435.

Drawing after Laches Accuses Sostrata, Orosius Master; ms fr. 664, fol. 213V in bibliotheque nationale de france circa 1412

Drawing after Pamphila in Libri, Orsius Workshop; ms fr. 664, fol. 137V in the bibliothèque de l’Arsenal in Paris, France circa 1407

Drawing after the Wedding of the parents of St. Marie; Chantilly Mus. Conde, ms 722, fol 48(detail) Paris, France circa 1464

Drawing after the Maximilian of Austria presents The Collar of the Golden Fleece, Diego of Valera; New Haven, Yale University, Beinecke lib. ms230, fol. 118(detail) Bruges, circa 1482

Drawing after The Romance of King Validus by Rustin de Pisa in the British Museum, London, late 13th century

A woman wears a royal blue frontlace gown with a contrasting black kirtle. She covers her hair with a red and black flemish hood. Not shown are her red linen stockings held up with a pair of wool garters and her black turn shoes. She finishes the look with a bright red belt.

A woman Shows off her red and black Flemish hood by contrasting it with her white wimple. We can just see her royal blue frontlace gown with a contrasting black kirtle as she turns to face the camera.

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