Linen Short-tail Hood

Linen Short-tail Hood

$29.95$44.95

    • Based on contemporary medieval artwork(see Historical Inspirations below)
    • Made in 100% Linen, also made in Wool
    • All interior seams enclosed or finished
    • No visible machine stitching
    • Available in a medieval palette of natural and jewel tones
    • For a long-tailed version of this hood, which is open in front, see our Liripipe Hood
    • Can be custom ordered in any color combination as a Parti-colored hood +$15
    • If you choose parti-colored option add your color choices in the comments box during checkout
    • One size fits most

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About our Short-tailed Hood

Head-coverings were a critical component of dress in the Middle Ages. Hoods were common with men and women of all classes, and came in a wide variety of forms: long tailed or liripipe, short-tailed, dagged or straight hems, either pull-over or with an open front that was buttoned or pinned closed. Only the sumptuousness of the fabric, elaborateness of the dagging, or extreme length of the tail distinguished the hood of a duke from that of a villein. Men wore their hoods alone or with a plain linen coif beneath or a hat over, while women seem to have worn the hoods alone or with a wimple. In general, the most extreme version of this style with the longest tail or, liripipe, was typical in the mid to late fourteenth century while our short-tailed version is more typical of earlier fourteenth century portrayals. It is offered in the same colors as our popular linen tunics, cottes and gowns. Made of 100% linen this hood is joined in the front for the ease of pull-over wear and is a cool and authentic solution to keeping the sun at bay.

Color

Red, Burgundy, Dark Green, Oatmeal, Sage, Blue, Gold, Dark Brown, Slate Blue, Purple, White, Parti-colored(custom)

2 reviews for Linen Short-tail Hood

5.0
Based on 2 reviews
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    (verified owner)

    Anonymous (verified owner)

    Verified reviewVerified review - view originalExternal link

    These hoods are really well-made, and I appreciate the short tail. Long-tailed hoods can be a problem.

    (verified owner)

    Ian F. (verified owner)

    Verified reviewVerified review - view originalExternal link

    The hood was perfect, exactly what I wanted for my 14th century look.

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White, Black, Red, Royal Blue, Burgundy, Purple

Slate Blue, Sage, Dark Green, Oatmeal, Dark Brown, Gold

Note: Please note, with the difficulty of accurately representing colors on a variety of monitors, the color names are meant as descriptions along with the swatches. Please use both when deciding on what color to order. Also, despite how the colors may appear on your monitor the same color names in Wool, Silk and Linen are different and do not exactly coordinate.

Head-coverings were a critical component of dress in the Middle Ages. Hoods were common with men and women of all classes, and came in a wide variety of forms: long tailed or liripipe, short-tailed, dagged or straight hems, either pull-over or with an open front that was buttoned or pinned closed. Only the sumptuousness of the fabric, elaborateness of the dagging, or extreme length of the tail distinguished the hood of a duke from that of a villein. Men wore their hoods alone or with a plain linen coif beneath or a hat over, while women seem to have worn the hoods alone or with a wimple. In general, the most extreme version of this style with the longest tail or, liripipe, was typical in the mid to late fourteenth century while our short-tailed version is more typical of earlier fourteenth century portrayals. It is offered in the same colors as our popular linen tunics, cottes and gowns. Made of 100% linen this hood is joined in the front for the ease of pull-over wear and is a cool and authentic solution to keeping the sun at bay.

Drawing after The Poems of Piers the Ploughman circa 1377 in the Library of Trinity College, Cambridge, England

Drawing after Les tres belles Heures de Notre-Dame du duc Jean de Berry MS. 11 060-61l circa 1380 in the Bibliotheque Royale de Belgique, Brussells, Belgium

Drawing after a detail of a misericord in Glouchester Cathedral circa 1350, Glouchester, England

Drawing after the Warwick Psalter – Hours for Sarum Use, MS M.893, fol. 6v, circa 1430, in London England

Drawing after Book of Hours for Rome Use, MS M.287, fol.64v, circa 1445 in The Free Library of Philadelphia, Rare Book Department, Pennsylvania, USA

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