14th c. Reversible Silk Hood

14th c. Reversible Silk Hood

$99.95

    • Based on contemporary medieval artwork(see Historical Inspirations below)
    • Made-to-order, allow 4-6 weeks for delivery
    • Authentic lines for comfortable, distinguished look
    • Made in 100% Raw Silk, also available in Linen, and Wool versions
    • Completely lined garment
    • Available in rich jewel tones, in any combination of your choice
    • Designed to be closed with your own pin or buttons so you can accessorize to match your outfit
    • Completely reversible so you get two distinct looks in one
    • This style is made to order so please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery
    • Price: $99.95

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About our 14th c. Silk Hood

Head-coverings were a critical component of dress in the Middle Ages. Hoods were common with men and women of all classes, and came in a wide variety of forms: long tailed or liripipe, short-tailed, dagged or straight hems, either pull-over or with an open front that was buttoned or pinned closed. Only the sumptuousness of the fabric, elaborateness of the dagging, or extreme length of the tail distinguished the hood of a duke from that of a villein.

Men wore their hoods alone or with a plain linen coif beneath or a hat over, while women seem to have worn the hoods alone or with a wimple. In general, the most extreme version of this style with the longest tail or, liripipe, was typical in the mid to late fourteenth century while our short-tailed version is more typical of earlier fourteenth century portrayals. Since it is fully reversible it is like having two hoods in one! The open front can be fastened with a badge so that you can accessorize to match your outfit. You also can leave it open and turn back the front, revealing the contrast lining, as women often did later in the fourteenth and early fifteenth centuries.

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Brick Red, Black, Hunter Green, Royal Blue, Purple

Note: Please note, with the difficulty of accurately representing colors on a variety of monitors, the color names are meant as descriptions along with the swatches. Please use both when deciding on what color to order. Also, despite how the colors may appear on your monitor the same color names in Wool, Silk and Linen are different and do not exactly coordinate.

Head-coverings were a critical component of dress in the Middle Ages. Hoods were common with men and women of all classes, and came in a wide variety of forms: long tailed or liripipe, short-tailed, dagged or straight hems, either pull-over or with an open front that was buttoned or pinned closed. Only the sumptuousness of the fabric, elaborateness of the dagging, or extreme length of the tail distinguished the hood of a duke from that of a villein.

Men wore their hoods alone or with a plain linen coif beneath or a hat over, while women seem to have worn the hoods alone or with a wimple. In general, the most extreme version of this style with the longest tail or, liripipe, was typical in the mid to late fourteenth century while our short-tailed version is more typical of earlier fourteenth century portrayals. Since it is fully reversible it is like having two hoods in one! The open front can be fastened with a badge so that you can accessorize to match your outfit. You also can leave it open and turn back the front, revealing the contrast lining, as women often did later in the fourteenth and early fifteenth centuries.

Drawing after a detail of the ‘Book of Hunting’ of Gaston Phobeus, MS. francais 616, circa mid 14th century in the Bibliotheque National, Paris, France

Drawing after a detail in the Lutrell Psalter circa 1340 British Museum, London, England

Drawing after a Omne Bonum an Encyclopedia of Canon Law circa late 1340s

Drawing after a detail of the Romance of Alexander, MS. Bodley 264, circa 1344 in the Bodeleian Library, Oxford, England

Drawing after Status de L’Ordre du Saint Esprit, MS. fr. 4274, circa 1353 in the Bibliotheque National, Paris, France

Drawing after a detail of an illuminated MS fr. 364 fol. 197r. circa 1315 in the Bibliotheque National, Paris, France

Drawing after a detail of the painted ceiling in the Hall of Justice circa 1354 in The Alahambra, Granada, Spain

Drawing after a detail from a 15th century MS in The British Museum, London, England

Drawing after the Bourgeouise of Mans, circa 1362 in the Bibliotheque National, Paris, France

Drawing after a detail in the Romance of King Meneleas circa 1364-1380 in the British Museum, London, England

Drawing after the Viconti Hours circa 1390 in The National Library, Florence , Italy

Drawing after Le Tres Riches Heures of Jean Duc de Berry circa 1413 in the Bibliotheque du Musee Conde, Chantilly, France

Drawing after the Maciejowski Bible circa 1250 in the Pierpont Morgan Libary, New York, USA

Drawing after ‘Les Chroniques de Saint-Denis’ MS Roy.20 CVII, circa early 15th century in the British Museum, London, England

Drawing after a detail in the Lutrell Psalter circa 1340 British Museum, London, England

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